Information for
Queer-Identifying Women

MYTH

Women who have sex with women are not at risk for sexually transmitted infections. There is no need to worry about STIs.

FACT

Queer women are not always at low- or no-risk of getting sexually transmitted infections. Depending on your sexual practices and/or those of your partner(s), you could be equally at risk for sexually-transmitted infections. You still need to be proactive about practicing safer sex and getting regularly screened for STIs.

Show me the numbers!

In a study of 6,935 self-identified queer women, 17.2% reported a history of having STIs.

30% of women who have sex with women had HPV. 19% of women who only had sex with women had HPV.

Chlamydia

Queer women who only have sex with other women are at low risk of contracting bacterial STIs like chlamydia and gonorrhea. However, women who have had sex with someone with a penis may pass on an STI to a queer woman through the sharing of sex toys or by rubbing vulvas together.

Why get tested?

A swab test, especially a self-collected vaginal swab, for people with vaginas is proven to be more sensitive for diagnosing chlamydia and gonorrhea than health professional collected endocervical swabs and urine testing. 

Endocervical swabs and urine testing might miss up to 10% of chlamydia and gonorrhea infections in vagina owners.

Early Detection: Getting tested regularly means you’ll be able to treat any infections as soon as possible. Leaving these infections untreated can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), ectopic pregnancy, infertility and chronic pelvic pain, so you definitely want to get these treated as soon as you can!

Prevention: Getting tested regularly for Chlamydia and Gonorrhea means you’ll be able to treat the infection as soon as possible if your positive. Both infections are treated with antibiotics. Knowing you’re STI-free means you can go into sexual relationships knowing your status and being open with your partners.

Learn more about Chlamydia >>>

Get tested with the Eve Kit Service for Chlamydia/Gonorrhea

The Eve Kit Service for Chlamydia/Gonorrhea provides you with a self-sampling swab and connects you with a laboratory to test for both chlamydia and gonorrhea. The service helps you get tested from the convenience of your home.

Gonorrhea

Queer women who only have sex with other women are at low risk of contracting bacterial STIs like chlamydia and gonorrhea. However, women who have had sex with someone with a penis may pass on an STI to a queer woman through the sharing of sex toys or by rubbing vulvas together.

Why get tested?

A swab test, especially a self-collected vaginal swab, for people with vaginas is proven to be more sensitive for diagnosing chlamydia and gonorrhea than health professional collected endocervical swabs and urine testing. 

Endocervical swabs and urine testing might miss up to 10% of chlamydia and gonorrhea infections in vagina owners.

Early Detection: Getting tested regularly means you’ll be able to treat any infections as soon as possible. Leaving these infections untreated can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), ectopic pregnancy, infertility and chronic pelvic pain, so you definitely want to get these treated as soon as you can!

Prevention: Getting tested regularly for Chlamydia and Gonorrhea means you’ll be able to treat the infection as soon as possible if your positive. Both infections are treated with antibiotics. Knowing you’re STI-free means you can go into sexual relationships knowing your status and being open with your partners.

Learn more about Gonorrhea >>>

Get tested with the Eve Kit Service for Chlamydia/Gonorrhea

The Eve Kit Service for Chlamydia/Gonorrhea provides you with a self-sampling swab and connects you with a laboratory to test for both chlamydia and gonorrhea. The service helps you get tested from the convenience of your home.

Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

HPV is a very common and highly contagious STI, with over 200 strains out there. It is estimated that 75% to 80% of sexually active adults will have an HPV infection at some point in their lives. This holds true for queer women as HPV can be transmitted through hand-to-vagina, vagina-to-vagina and mouth-to-vagina contact.

Out of these 200 strains, there are 14 high risk strains known to potentially cause cervical cancer and 40 low risk strains known to cause genital warts.

Why get tested?

High risk strains of HPV generally do not show any symptoms of infection. The only real way to find out is to do a HPV test. Testing positive for a high risk strain of HPV does not mean that you have cervical cancer, but that there is an increased possibility of you developing cervical cancer and additional testing might be needed.

Early Detection: Getting an HPV test means you know are being very proactive with your health. A Pap test looks for precancerous cells already in your body, while an HPV test informs you whether you are at high risk or low risk of getting cervical cancer in the future.

Prevention: If you know you don’t have HPV, the likelihood of you having cervical cancer in the next 10 – 15 years is extremely low. If you test positive for a high-risk HPV strain, then you can take the necessary steps for your health and your sexual partners. This might mean additional testing to see whether the HPV infection has resulted in abnormalities, or monitoring the infection and ensuring you don’t pass the infection off to your sexual partners.

Learn more about HPV >>>

Get tested with the Eve Kit Service for HPV

The Eve Kit Service for HPV provides you with a self-sampling swab and connects you with a laboratory to let you test for high risk strains for HPV. The service helps you identify if you are at risk for developing cervical cancer.